Register to vote

Most people register to vote between September and November every year when we deliver a registration form to your home. This is known as the 'annual canvass'.

You can also register throughout the year as the electoral register is updated every month.

Register to vote

If you don't have access to the internet or would rather fill in a paper form, please contact us with your name and address and we will send it to you.

Check if your name is on the Electoral Register

Please contact us using the details at the bottom of the page and we will check for you. There is no online access to the Electoral Register.

Moving house

You should re-register to vote every time you move house. You are now able to change your registration details every time you move, and not just once a year. People can now register to vote online. If you wish to re-register please visit the GOV.UK website.

If you don't have access to the internet or would rather fill in a paper form, please contact us with your name and address and we will send it to you. If you have filled in and returned an annual canvass registration form since you moved to your new home, you do not need to register again.

If you move during the annual canvass then you should complete the annual canvass forms to reflect your address on 15 October. If you move after you have completed the annual canvass form then visit the GOV.UK website and fill in their online form or contact us for an application form.

Why register

You need to be on the electoral register to vote in all UK elections and referendums. You are not automatically registered even if you pay council tax. Not being registered may also affect your credit rating.

Who can register

You can register to vote if you are:

  • 16 or over (but you can't vote until you are 18)
  • British, Irish Republic, Commonwealth or European Union citizen living in the UK

If you are 16 or 17, you can only register to vote if you will be 18 within the lifetime of the electoral register. You cannot vote until you are 18.

No fixed residence or long-term hospital stay?

If you do not have a permanent residence (say you are a rough sleeper or sofa surfer) or don't stay in the same place for long periods (say a boater) you can make a Declaration of Local Connection.

Long-term residents of hospitals (either medical or mental) can set up an absent vote for their usual address. They are able to continue the registration at what would be their usual address if they weren’t in hospital.

If they are long-term in-patients at a mental health institution they can either:

  • continue with the registration at their home address if their stay is less than six months;
  • if their stay is longer, or they prefer, they can register a declaration of local connection at the hospital. The only except are those that are detained in a mental institution following a criminal conviction who cannot register at all.

For further information and to register online go to the Electoral Commission's website.

Students

Students are entitled to register at both their home address and their university address. Although it is an offence to vote more than once in a national election, you can vote in local elections at both of your addresses.   

Please note: if the student's home address is in the same local authority area as the university address, for example if their parents' home was in Headington and university address in Jericho, it would be an offence to vote twice in the City elections. Likewise if their parents' home was in Abingdon, and their term address was west Oxford, it would be an offence for them to vote twice in a County Council election.

Visit the Students page of the About My Vote website for more details.

How long it takes to register

Applications received before the middle of the month will appear from the first working day of the following month. The only exceptions to this will be during an election period when no changes can be made to the register and during the annual canvass in the Autumn.

Postal and Proxy voting

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