Age and Gender

Age profile

  • At the 2011 Census it was estimated that 32% of Oxford's population was aged 18-29 years (compared to 17% for Oxfordshire and 16% for England and Wales), and the city has the youngest median age – 29.9 years – of any place in England & Wales
  • Between 2000 and 2010, there was been a marked increase in the birth rate causing a rise in the number of children. The general fertility rate has been in decline since 2011 (download fertility rate document).
     
  • There has also been a large rise in the number of young people aged 25–29 years. Meanwhile, the number of people aged over 75 years has decreased.
  • As a result of the decreased birth rate, in the next decade, there will be a marked decrease in the number of young people aged 0-10 years – from 19,600 in 2016 to 17,500 in 2026.

Population age structure by single year of age and sex for local authorities, counties, regions and England as a whole, mid-2016 to mid-2041 (Office for National Statistics)

 

Publications

Older People Needs Analysis (November 2013)

Tackling Isolation Pilot Project Evaluation (October 2013)

Children and Young People Needs Analysis 2013

Oxford population by age and gender, 2011 Census

Map: proportion of people of pensionable age (2005 estimates)

Map: proportion of people aged 0 to 15 years (2005 estimates)

Chart of the Month

Baby boom, young adults and students: age profiles in Oxford (December 2013)

More children, more young people, fewer older people (August 2012)

Oxford becoming more diverse and international (January 2012)

Data 

Oxford population by age and gender, 2011 Census

Oxford age profile by ward with an interactive chart, 2011 Census

Oxford Population Estimate 2001-2006

Projected population growth in children and young people, 2013-2023

Further information

Population projections 2016-2041: Statistical bulletin and interactive charts (Office for National Statistics)

Population forecasts dashboard on Oxfordshire Insight

A Tale of Two Counties: growing older in Oxfordshire (link to PDF) - Age UK report