Public Spaces Protection Orders

Public Spaces Protection Orders (PSPOs) were introduced by the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.

They specify an area where activities are taking place that are or could be detrimental to the local community's quality of life, and impose conditions or restrictions on people using that area. Breaching the prohibitions could result in a Fixed Penalty Notice or prosecution at Court.

Current Orders 

Alcohol Public Spaces Protection Order 2020

Oxford City Council Cabinet approved the new Alcohol Disorder Public Spaces Protection Order 2020 on 11 November 2020.  The Order begins on the 28th November and last for three years.

The Order creates an offence in the restricted area for any person to refuse to stop drinking alcohol or hand over any containers (sealed or unsealed) which are believed to contain alcohol, when required to do so by a police officer or authorised officer in order to prevent public nuisance or disorder, unless they have a reasonable excuse. 

The Order can be downloaded below:

Alcohol Disorder PSPO 2020

Dog Control Public Spaces Protection Order 2020

Oxford City Council Cabinet approved the new Dog Control Public Spaces Protection Order 2020 on 11 November 2020.  The Order begins on the 28th November and last for three years.  The Orders covers all public areas within the Oxford City Council Local Authority boundary.

The Order requires:

  • Owners to put their dog on a lead if required by an Authorised Officer.
  • A person not to be in control of more than four dogs at the same time.
  • Remove their dog’s faeces.
  • Owners to keep their dogs out of children’s play areas.

The Order can be downloaded below:

Dog Control PSPO 2020

Orders not approved or expired

Draft Waterways Public Spaces Protection Order

On 17 March 2016 Oxford City Council’s City Executive Board resolved to consult on a draft Waterways Public Spaces Protection Order (PSPO) for the waterways of Oxford. The purpose of the Order was to restrict behaviours in an area that are considered detrimental to the quality of life of people with the area.  The Council’s City Executive Board considered the findings and decided not to introduce such an Order.

More information on the draft order can be found on our Draft Waterways Public Spaces Protection Order.

Foresters Tower 

The order prevented young people under the age of 21, who were not legal residents, from entering the tower block unless visiting a resident.

The order can be downloaded below:

Foresters Towers Public Spaces Protection Order 

City Centre 

On 15 October 2015, Oxford City Council’s Executive Board approved a City Centre Public Spaces Protection Order. For the committee papers, visit our City Executive Board - 15 October 2015 pages.

The order was live from 1 February 2016 for three years. It has now expired.  

Alcohol Public Spaces Protection Order 2017-2020

Oxford City Council implemented a Designated Public Places Order (DPPO) in 2006 to address alcohol-related disorder in the city.  The DPPO made it an offence, within the administrative boundary of the city of Oxford, to fail to surrender alcohol to a police officer if requested to do so.

Section 75, Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, repeals this Order and replaced it with a Public Spaces Protection Order (PSPO) on the 20 October 2017. 

There are two minor differences between the DPPO and PSPO:

  • An authorised Council or other delegated officer, as well as a police officer, can require the alcohol to be surrendered.
  • There is a time limit of three years on the PSPO when it will either expire or be extended

The Order can be downloaded below:

Alcohol Public Spaces Protection Order

Dog Control Public Spaces Protection Order

Oxford City Council implemented five Dog Control Orders in 2011 that introduced a number of offences relating to the control of dogs in the city.

Section 75, Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, repeals these Orders and replaces them with a Public Spaces Protection Order (PSPO) on the 20 October 2017. 

There are two minor differences between the Dog Control Orders and the PSPO:

  • A police officer, or officer delegated by the Council, as well as an authorised Council officer can enforce the PSPO.
  • There is a time limit of three years on the PSPO when it will either expire or be extended

The Orders can be downloaded below:

Penalty for breaches of Orders

It is an offence for a person, without reasonable excuse, to:

  • Do anything that the person is prohibited from doing by a PSPO (other than consume alcohol - see below); or
  • Fail to comply with a requirement to which the person is subject under a PSPO.

A person guilty of an offence is liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale, or a fixed penalty notice of £100.

It is not an offence to drink alcohol in a public place in Oxford. However, it is an offence to fail to comply with a request to cease drinking or surrender alcohol within the cities administrative boundary. A person guilty of an offence is liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding level 2 on the standard scale, or a fixed penalty notice of £100. If alcohol is confiscated, it can be disposed of by the person who confiscates it.

If the fixed penalty notice is paid within its required timescale no further action will be taken. Failure to pay within this time may result in a prosecution for the breach of the order.

For more information, you can contact the Anti-Social Behaviour Service.